Public disservice announcement for ambitious jihardiots

So you’re just not satisfied with blowing up the odd offending building or bus, anymore? Yeah that just does not cut it these days. The message is really not sinking in. People are just so goddamn stubborn, and simply will not accept the last true faith willingly. What you need is to ramp it up a bit – or perhaps a whole lot.

Yeah! Being blown up into 72 pieces is just not enough. What is required is more pieces and for that you need a bigger bang. Nuclear big!

Well you’re in luck because graphic designer Maximilian Bode has performed the complex calculations to enable you to determine the minimum number of nuclear devices necessary to blow up a whole city, a whole state or province, even the whole world. Because, let’s face it – nothing short of total Armageddon is going to make the infidels sit up and listen. Even if it may be rather difficult sitting up and listening in such a state of bodily separation.

Depending on the size of the device you deviously manage to get your hands on, it would take between 19 (Little Boy used in WW2) and 1 (B53 or Castle Bravo or Tzar Bomba modern-day device), to obliterate New York for instance. You need only be limited by your level of ambition, and capacity to satisfy hordes of virgins.

Off course securing the nuclear fuel for these delightful death devices may be a little tricky, but if you can worm your way into the good books of certain South African politicians who happen to also be senior members of the African Nuclear Commission (ANC), you may be able to secure what you need. All it takes is money, or a car or house or Breitling watch. But it also doesn’t hurt to first secure the services of a middle man, and South Africa has quite a few disgraced former Police Commissioners and assorted suspended “leaders” who will be quite happy to assist you, having had plenty experience in securing stuff.

So I’ll leave you to it then. Go fetch.

Something stinks in South Africa, and it’s not Lolly Jackson’s dead body

I’ve been following two recent events with some interest; not because they’re particularly riveting, but because they reveal a stark contrast in the competence of the Police in two different countries.

On Saturday, 01 May, a potential car bombing in New York’s Times Square was foiled because of an alert street vendor and the work of the Police. Follow-up detective work eventually led to the arrest on 04 May, of a Pakistani man who was within minutes of escaping. But thanks to the brilliant detective work of the New York Police, the suspect was apprehended on board a flight ready to take off. He apparently confessed soon after being arrested. A nice neat, happy ending, in little more than 3 days.

On Monday, 03 May, notorious strip club owner, Lolly Jackson was gunned down in a house in Edenvale, South Africa. The killer apparently called the head of Crime Intelligence, Joey Mabasa to report the shooting on the same night. Speculation about why the killer, an alleged drug dealer and police informant had the number of a senior police officer so readily available, is not important for now; although it may well be at a later stage. What’s important and somewhat nauseating is why the police have still not managed 2 days later, to apprehend a self-confessed killer, who is apparently well-known to them, and driving the victims car around.

Indications are that the police are clueless as to the killer’s whereabouts, and it’s likely they will remain clueless for some time to come. I don’t believe South Africans are too surprised though at the apparent incompetence of the police. It’s all too familiar.

Something really stinks in this whole saga, and it’s not coming from the body of that rotten scoundrel, Lolly Jackson. No, this smell is rather familiar; we get a whiff of it every time a crime is committed in South Africa, and we find the police either unwilling or unable to do something about it.

It’s a national disgrace.

On the Anniversary of Human Madness

The anniversary yesterday, of the destruction of the WTC  Twin Towers in New York by religious fundamentalists, passed with little worldwide fuss.Eight years after people of faith reached  an all-time new low in the war of religious domination, the bombings and mayhem continue with no sign of abating. Only now, the religious war is driven largely by political ideology as well as hatred.

As I sit here watching endless documentaries on television about those moments of madness on September 11, 2001, I am more convinced than ever that religion does not belong in the public domain. Those wishing to practice strange rituals and believe strange things, should only do so in the privacy of their homes.

Will we ever return to the day when faith moved only imaginary mountains, instead of real-life high-rise building? Will history speculate that faith caused the end of human civilization? After we’re all gone, will it matter?